Research Case Study: Professional Lives and Culture of Self-Employed Barristers

Aralanta Goulandris

Atalanta Goulandris is a PhD student at City University London

Her inter-disciplinary research topic is: Continuity and Change: The Professional Lives and Culture of Self-Employed Barristers in England & Wales, Socio-Legal (Department of Sociology, supervision from Sociology and Law) 4th year

Atalanta is on Twitter https://twitter.com/greekie50

Atalanta has recently had an article published:  Reshaping professionalism: branding, marketing and the new entrepreneurial barrister (2015) http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/09695958.2015.1093940

City University London Library

The City University London Library  has many Sociology and Law resources.  There are useful subject guides prepared by Library staff and a comprehensive researcher guide.   There is a Sociology guide and guides for Law and professional Law studies. These guides are a useful starting point for doing research and highlight useful electronic resources such as Westlaw and Lexis Library. There is a list of some of the Law databases.

Some search terms that Atalanta has used for literature searching are: professionalism, organisation studies, the legal profession, professional identity formation, professional culture.

Atalanta has found City Library’s Read for Research  scheme very useful  for ordering research books to be added to the  library’s collection.  Here is a selection of titles ordered by City’s research students.

Other libraries

Students doing research should join the SCONUL Access scheme. This allows staff and students to use University libraries in London and throughout the country. A useful Library for Law research students and staff is the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies.

Research students and staff should definitely join the British Library at St Pancras. The British Library is the national library and has extensive collections and some electronic resources that can be used in the reading rooms.

Data analysis

 Atalanta has used MaxQDA for qualitative data analysis.

Social media resources

 Twitter is useful to keep up to date with legal news, legal journalists, lawyers’ tweets and blogs and for accessing documents and reports.

@lawbore is a useful Twitter feed and the Lawbore website has many tutorials, resources and the Future Lawyer blog.

Advice to new researchers

Atalanta co-founded the Sociology Anonymous Seminar Series with Jon Eilenberg, with a view to creating a PhD Sociology community. “One year on, it has definitely created a core group of regulars who now not only meet every fortnight to listen to a presentation from one member, but also convene at other times, often informally. This is a very good way of getting experience presenting your work but also allows you to meet and exchange ideas with peers. We now often link each other up with relevant things we have spotted on Twitter or blogs etc. My other advice is to keep reading right the way through. There is a temptation to focus on fieldwork after your upgrade, but much of my really material reading happened after that. I love the Read for Research library scheme at City University London Library and have used it extensively.”

Research Case Study: Gastronomy and Modernization

Aysegul Kesimoglu, PhD student, City,  University of London

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Aysegul is a research student at City University London, her profile page and some of her publications and conference papers can be found at: http://www.city.ac.uk/arts-social-sciences/culture-and-creative-industries/research/research-students/aysegul-kesimoglu

 Working thesis title: Gastronomy and Modernization: A case study of taste and eating out in Istanbul. (Title, work-in-progress) (Researching this since 2012).

 City Research Online is the institutional repository or research database of City University London and this contains research outputs, articles, theses written by City academics and research students. Aysegul’s articleA reconceptualization of gastronomy as relational and reflexive’ is available from City Research Online at: http://openaccess.city.ac.uk/11908/

This article merges Aysegul’s previous research on food tourism with her current pursuits in food’s symbolic and positional value.

 Aysegul was a co-founder of the SASS (School of Social Sciences and Arts) Research Students’ Society/Community at City. The society was founded in January 2014 with the hope and aim that it would provide a platform for networking between and professional development for SASS PhD students.

 The City University London Library website can be found at: www.city.ac.uk/library

CityLibrary Search is a resource discovery tool which searches across a wide range of resources including books, electronic books, journals, journal articles and databases.

Aysegul recommends these books:

Ashley B, Hollows J, Jones S and Taylor B (2004) Food and Cultural Studies. London and New York: Routledge.

Caplan P (1997) Approaches to the study of food, health and identity. In: Caplan, P (ed) Food, Health and Identity. London and New York: Routledge, 1-31.

Counihan C and Van Esterik P (2013) Why Food? Why Culture? Why Now? Introduction to the Third Edition. In: Counihan, C and Van Esterik, P (eds) Food and Culture: A Reader. New York and Oxon: Routledge, pp. 1-17.

And, Warde, Alan. ‘Consumption, Food and Taste’.

The journal Food, Culture and Society is useful for studying the cultural aspects of food and gastronomy.

Read for Research

 Since November 2013, City University London Library has been running a scheme whereby research students and staff can request that books for their research can be purchased via a webform. A blog post about Read for Research can be found on the Citylibresearchers blog. Aysegul has ordered some books via the scheme and has found this very useful.

Research tools

A useful tool for saving PDFs of articles and note-taking for collaborating with other colleagues or students is Evernote and Aysegul has recently started using this. There is a Researcher guide produced by City University London Library including a section on Social media and information about Evernote

Social media

Aysegul’s blog and Twitter feed.

Aysegul recommends following Discover Society on Twitter to remain aware of what other researchers are undertaking and what debates are important in general within Social Sciences.

Also find other researchers and journalists to follow. For discussions, see the hashtag #phdchat on Twitter

The Thesis whisperer is a useful blog for helpful tips on managing the PhD stress and especially for writing tips. The following articles are useful when starting a PhD:

http://thesiswhisperer.com/2011/02/01/advice-for-newbies/

http://thesiswhisperer.com/2015/10/14/a-half-way-through-your-phd-checklist/?utm_content=bufferfcf27&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter.com&utm_campaign=buffer

Other libraries

In terms of using other libraries, students and staff can join the SCONUL Access scheme and the national library, the British Library.

Advice to new researchers

“Read a lot and do not be scared to read around. Sometimes inspiring ideas come out of nowhere. But know when to stop. You will start the PhD full of ideas and will want to pursue a lot of things at the same time. You need to learn to control your enthusiasm and sometimes the only way to do is to stop reading and to take a step back and reconsider where you are, where you were coming from and which way you want to go. Build a good relationship with your supervisor, you will realize their advice is invaluable. Engage with your community and speak with people. A PhD does not have to be as lonely as it is often said to be.”

Research case study: Privacy and Social Media

David Haynes, Visiting Lecturer in the Department of Library and Information Science, City University London.

David Haynes

David successfully completed a PhD in 2015 on the topic of Privacy and social media. A copy of David’s thesis Risk and Regulation of Access to Personal Data on Online Social Networking Services in the UK  is available from City Research Online at  http://openaccess.city.ac.uk/11972/ City Research Online  is City University London’s open access institutional repository or research database which contains research outputs from City staff and research students.

Another of David’s articles on City Research Online is: Risk and Regulation of Access to Personal Data on Online Social Networking Services in the UK http://openaccess.city.ac.uk/6228/

Article on The Conversation.com called Forget the right to be forgotten, other means exist

Article on The Conversation: End of Safe Harbour isn’t the end of the world – let’s hope its successor is better

David is also a Management Consultant Management consultant and project manager with expertise in information management, metadata, information governance and taxonomies. See the occasional blog Aspire Squared Ltd

Social media

 LinkedIn is a networking tool that helps you make connections and create a professional network and share blog posts, articles etc. See David’s LinkedIn profile

David recommends Twitter for connecting with other researchers and contacts. He can be found on Twitter at https://twitter.com/JDavidHaynes It is useful to follow researchers and organisations of interest and also hashtags such as #citylis from the Department of Library and Information Science at City.

Resources from City, University of London Library.

David has conducted interdisciplinary research which includes aspects of Law, Business, Computing.

City University London Library has created some Library guides for different subjects at: http://libguides.city.ac.uk There are guides for Law and Information Science for example.

A comprehensive researcher Library guide is also available. This covers research resources, managing information, sharing research etc. There is also a social media guide on using social media resources to manage your research and promote your research.

The large, multidisciplinary database Ebscohost has been useful for David’s research. Ebscohost covers a wide range of subjects ranging from Business to Health. The Law resources website Lawbore was also useful in the initial stages of David’s research.

Other libraries

The British Library is the national Library and is based at St Pancras. It is recommended that all research students and staff join the British Library. It is possible to pre-register for a reader pass. It is a reference library so all materials have to be consulted there. There are also some electronic resources that are available for use in the British Library Reading Rooms.

Reference management software

David uses Mendeley, this is a free tool enabling you to capture, organise, annotate, store and share your references and also to join and form groups and networks and to discover and share papers. David’s Mendeley profile is at:  https://www.mendeley.com/profiles/david-haynes1/ See also the City University London Library online Mendeley guide.

City University London also subscribes to the reference management tool RefWorks. City staff and students can set up a RefWorks account. RefWorks is an online reference management tool which enables you to import, store and manage references from your research and create bibliographies. See also the RefWorks guide. 

Advice to new researchers

“Twitter is a great tool for connecting with others at the same event and for picking up new research ideas”.

ORCID provides a digital identifier that distinguishes you from every other researcher . It is a good idea to set up an Orcid profile as a researcher if you are publishing articles etc as this will ensure your work is more easily found and will be correctly attributed to you, see David’s Orcid profile.

Research Case Study: Cultural Policy

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Current research interest: thesis title: Intergovernmental policy coordination in European Union cultural policy: the Open Method of Coordination and the 2011-2014 Work Plan for Culture

Resources at City, University of London Library 

CityLibrary Search  is a resource discovery tool which searches across a wide range of resources including books, ebooks,  ejournals, databases.

Kate recommends the City University London library subject guides  for different subjects and the comprehensive City University London Researcher guide covering research resources, reference management, sharing research etc.

You can also find databases and electronic journals on the Library Guides page.

Kate recommends David Silverman’s Doing qualitative research and the  International Journal of Social Research Methodology

Publications & blog

Kate’s  blog is at: http://kmattocks.wordpress.com/

Conference presentation titles

News article/ analysis on election coverage.

 Social media

Kate finds find Twitter to be very useful; blogs are interesting to hear of others’ experiences http://patthomson.net/ ; http://phdtalk.blogspot.nl/ ; Thesis Whisperer

Academia.edu is a social networking website for academics and researchers. See  Kate’s  Academia.edu profile.

Useful libraries 

Kate has found these libraries useful for her research: British Library, Bodleian Library, University of Oxford.

Research staff and students should definitely  join the British Library  which is the national library and has very extensive collections.

See our guide for information about using other libraries and joining the SCONUL Access scheme.

Advice to new researchers

“Literature reviews can be very overwhelming at the start. What I did was to make a list (two really, one journal articles and one books) and continued to add to it when I found a source and checked things off when I’d read it. It kept me organized. Also, enjoy the freedom and flexibility of your first year and read as much as you can”

Research Case Study: Library and Information Science

Ernesto

Current research interest: Library & Information Science . Other related research interest include: comics scholarship, digital humanities, open access publishing, research data management, scholarly communications.

Resources at City, University of London Library 

CityLibrary Search  is a resource discovery tool which searches across a wide range of resources including books, ebooks,  ejournals, databases.

Ernesto recommends the City University London library subject guides too for different subjects such as Information Science.  Education, Social Sciences.  The comprehensive City University London Researcher guide covering research resources, reference management, sharing research etc.

You can also find databases and electronic journals on the Library Guides page.

There are also library related databases such as LISA and LISTA. Other useful databases include: Taylor & Francis, Ebscohost, Emerald Insight and Wiley.

Recommended research tools 

Ernesto’s profile on  Mendeley   There is a City University London Library guide for Mendeley. Mendeley is a free tool enabling you to capture, organise, annotate, store and share your references.

Zotero  is a tool  used with the Firefox browser to help you collect, organize, cite, and share your research sources.  You can add PDFs, images, audio and video files, snapshots of web pages etc .

City University London subscribes to the reference management tool RefWorks which you can use to store and manage your references while doing your research. You can create an account at www.refworks.com

He also recommends the Directory of Open Access Journals to discover open access articles in a variety of disciplines.

 Publications

Some of Ernesto’s  publications can be found on:

The City, University of London Academic Experts profile page.

Blog post for WordPress beginners.

Long author-lists on research papers are threatening the academic work system
City Research online, the institutional repository or research database of City, University of London  also contains some of Ernesto’s  publications and datasets.

 Social media

Ernesto uses social media very much in his research and has a WordPress blog. He also edits the #citylis news blog.

He subscribes to lots of blog feeds and then disseminates information via paper.li and Twitter for example. Ernesto uses Twitter as a means to keep up with scholarship worldwide, past, present (and future!) colleagues and to share the work he does and the work of others. A useful blog is the LSE Impact of Social Sciences blog.

Useful libraries 

Ernesto has found these libraries useful for his research: British Library, Senate House Library, SOAS Library, Cartoon Library.

Research staff and students should definitely  join the British Library  which is the national library and has very extensive collections.

See our guide for information about using other libraries and joining the SCONUL Access scheme.

Advice to new researchers

“Don’t be afraid to innovate. Those who do things differently will stand out. ‘I’ve always done it like this’ is not a good excuse; research and learning are about discovery and pushing your own limits and areas of comfort.

Go out and explore. Share, collaborate, keep up, look up, look out, put yourself out there, professionally, ethically. Be generous, ask around, be patient but disciplined and persistent. Make sure you read before broadcasting an opinion and back up your opinions with evidence from quality sources. Above all follow your passion— even though there is always a painful element to learning, it is by doing what we enjoy that we succeed.”

 

Research Case Study: Employability and Information Literacy

Diane pic jacket

Current research interest: employability in higher education, using student experiences and opinions of this and how this can be correlated with information literacy provision in university libraries.

Employability

Researching employability and information literacy 

This book is really useful when beginning a research project:  Doing your research project : a guide for first-time researchers by Bell, Judith,  001.42 BEL ISBN: 9780335264469 Publication Date: 2014.

CityLibrary Search   Examples of search terms include: Employability and university libraries   CityLibrary Search has a new RSS feed for searches. Recent careers titles at City University London Library.City University London Employability guide gives an overview of employability and some resources.

As the topic is multidisciplinary, see our library subject guides too for different subjects such as Education, Social Sciences, Information Science.

Databases to use could include: Taylor & Francis, Ebscohost, Emerald Insight and Wiley, there are also library related databases such as LISA and LISTA.

There is a very comprehensive SCONUL employability literature review. 

The  New Review of Academic Librarianship is a useful journal.

Research tools 

City University London subscribes to the reference management tool RefWorks which you can use to store and manage your references while doing your research. You can create an account at www.refworks.com

Evernote is useful for storing PDFs and reading them later for example  on a phone,  iPad or tablet.

Dropbox  can be used as a file management system to store documents.

BrowZine is a journal browsing app for a tablet.

Survey Monkey is a tool for designing online surveys and analysing the results.

Slideshare is useful for saving and sharing conference or other presentations

Presentations and blog posts

ALISS conference summer 2015 on Crowdsourcing. 

Engaging with students as co-creators of employability resources, University of Hertforshire 2015.

Developing @ City blog post on LILAC conference.

SCONUL Focus article on Employability.

Employability, Research & Information Literacy resources 

riverthames

Researcher guide  Our comprehensive City University London research guide covering research resources, reference management, sharing research etc.

Welcome

The purpose of this guide is to give a practical insight into researching different subjects from the point of view of a research student or staff member who has either recently researched the topic(s) or is a new or experienced researcher.  It concentrates on areas such as:  Library resources such as databases and journals, useful textbooks, literature searching experiences and keywords and any publications, articles blog posts etc.